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Longview Aviation to Revive De Havilland Canada Brand

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Longview Aviation Capital Corporation has announced de Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd. as its new subsidiary that will continue production of the popular Dash 8 aircraft series. The plant was sold earlier this year and acquired by the Public Sector Pension Investment Board but through terms of the a lease with the new owners production of the aircraft will continue at the plant until at least 2021 The Dash 8 joins other former De Havilland Canada products such as the Twin Otter and Beaver, both well used in the Canadian north as well as all other out of production De Havilland aircraft currently being manufactured in British Columbia by Longview’s other subsidiary Viking Air Ltd.

Longview paid $250 million for the rights to the dash 8 series of aircraft after liabilities, fees and closing adjustments. The sale comes as Bombardier looks to release assets in hopes of generating some capital after lacking sales in some of their different industries.  With the purchase Longview will acquire the license to the full Dash 8 program including the Q400, 100, 200 and 300 series of aircraft.

David Curtis, Chairman of Lonview stated current Bombardier sales, production and support staff involved with the Dash 8 program will be joining the Longview team. He also pledged that all manufacturing of the popular regional aircraft would stay within Canada while current contracts with international manufacturers for some of the parts would continue on.

Before the sale Bombardier was producing an average of 30 aircraft annually at the Downsview property. Downsview airport was original built in the 1920s to test De Havilland Canada Aircraft which started as a subsidiary of De Havilland, originally a British manufacturer which contributed heavily to England’s long and storied aviation history.

Photo courtesy of Liam Funnell, Downwind Photography

The Dash 8 is currently one of the most widely used regional aircraft in the world with a seating capacity of up to 40 depending on model and layout many operators choose the plane for it’s usability in smaller markets.

Featured image courtesy of Liam Funnell, Downwind Photography

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